It’s by far the best commercial I’ve seen on television is a long time. 

The Publix Mother’s Day ad clearly portrays the value of mothers. It tells a wonderful story without much ado and will likely go down as one of the best feel good spots of the year.

The commercial features an obviously pregnant woman and her daughter — likely 6 or 7 years old — working together in the kitchen. They’re busy preparing a tasty treat and talking about the new baby that will soon makes its appearance. The baby is moving in the womb so the mom takes her daughter’s hand and lets her feel. 

“I used to tell you secrets,” mom says of her pregnancy with the young daughter. “Why don’t you tell your sister a secret?”

There’s a little back and forth after the daughter asks, “What could I tell her?”

Soon after the cooking is done and, seemingly, long after the earlier exchange the young girl hops off a stool in the kitchen, stands in front of her mom, places both hands on the pregnant belly and leans in close. She whispers, “You’re going to love mom.”

It brought tears to my wife’s eyes.

“You should give your mom a shout out for Mother’s Day,” she said. “Write your column about her.”

“Yes, that’s not a bad idea,” I said. “But, I’ve already written one this week advising the guys on what not to get mom or a wife with children for the special day. It’s funny.”

After sleeping on it overnight, I woke up and thought, “Jayne’s right. I don’t take the chance to remember mom enough. She’s been gone from this earth for 24 years and there are times I still miss her terribly.”

Simple words can’t express the love a Mother shows. My mom, Kathleen, showed her love in how she ran the household, the way she sacrificed and worked after my dad died when I was only 8 years old and the pride she showed in her four children and seven grandchildren.

If I had the chance to sit down and talk with her today. I would tell her how much I love her and thank her for the life lessons she taught more by example than by words.

After telling Mother that her namesake, Amanda Kathleen, is almost a spitting image of her, that she has her strength of character, and that she is about to get married, I would begin rattling off the reasons she still means so much to me.

Mom:

Thanks for taking me to church, putting your faith in action and introducing me to Jesus.

Thanks for all the work you did to make a house a home.

Thanks for showing great patience when I went astray and for letting me learn important lessons the hard way.

Thanks for giving me a love for reading.

Thanks for constantly reminding me that I was a procrastinator (though I’m not cured I’m far better than I was growing up).

Thanks for not blowing your lid but simply reminding me of the consequences when the grades came in after my first semester in college.

Thanks for sticking by me when I did stupid things that got me in trouble but still making me take responsibility for my actions.

Thanks for all the hard jobs you got me during the summers that helped to teach me the value of hard work.

Thanks for loving my bride from the first time you met her. You were right; she is “a good one.”

Thanks for taking the time to hug and cuddle and read to Amanda.

Thanks for leaving me good memories, wisdom I haven’t yet tapped but still remember, and for a sister and pair of brothers that stick together through thick and thin.

Oh, thanks for teaching me how to make your fried chicken, the best ever, (though I don’t make it) and gravy.

Now, Mom, the secret’s out. You are still loved and appreciated.

Happy Mother’s Day.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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